Common Problems

Chalazion

s-patient2.jpgA chalazion is a lump that appears in the eyelid as a result of inflammation in an oil-producing sweat gland inside the skin. When this gland becomes blocked, it can rupture, which often leads to inflammation. A chalazion may cause swelling, occasional pain and redness. It can cause the eyelid to swell and can sometimes grow as large as an eighth of an inch.

Use warm compresses 10-15 minutes, 2-4 times a day to help reduce swelling. If after 3-4 days the swelling hasn’t subsided, contact our office. You should also contact us if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Headache
  • Fever
  • Blurred or decreased vision
  • Drainage
  • Extensive swelling and/or redness
  • If both eyes and/or eyelids are swollen

Stye

A stye is a tender, red bump on the eyelid caused by an acute infection or inflammation of the oil glands in the eyelid. If the gland is blocked, the oil produced by the gland will become congested and cause the oil to protrude through the wall of the gland forming a lump. A stye can grow on the upper and/or lower eyelid and cause tenderness and burning.

Most sties will go away on their own within a week. You can apply warm compresses 4-6 times a day, 15 minutes at a time to help the drainage. It is important to stop using eye makeup and lotions while the stye is present. Also, do not wear contact lenses because the stye could cause an infection that could spread to your cornea. You should seek treatment from your ophthalmologist if you experience any of the following symptoms:

  • Eyelid is swollen shut
  • Blurred or decreased vision
  • Swelling that lasts longer than three weeks
  • Eyelashes fall out
  • Sties on the bottom eyelid close to the nose
  • Fever
  • Excessive tearing
  • Stye is bleeding

Eye Allergies

Allergies
If you suffer from seasonal eye allergies, consult our office. Many different types of medical treatments for eye allergies are available by prescription. Be sure to see one of our doctors for prescription information if you experience unusual eye pain, tearing, itching or swelling.

Eye Drops and Allergies
Our doctors may prescribe eye drops to treat certain eye conditions, infections or diseases. Before you use any eye drops, be sure to tell our ophthalmologist/optometrist about any other prescription or non-prescription medications that you are taking or any allergies that you have.

Applying Eye Medication
Always wash your hands before applying eye medication. Open the bottle or tube being careful that its tip does not touch anything. Pull your lower eyelid down with the tip of your finger and look up or into a mirror. Squeeze one drop or a quarter-inch ribbon of ointment into the bottom lid, trying not to touch your eyelid with the tip of the bottle or tube. Close your eye gently to allow the medication to absorb.